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Traeger Mississippi Pot Roast

My Traeger Mississippi Pot Roast recipe makes a Southern-style pot roast that is full of big beefy flavors, a bit of spice, and plenty of smoke. This recipe started with a home cook in Mississippi, and it as simple as it is delicious.

Traeger Smoked Mississippi Pot Roast

Traeger Mississippi Pot Roast Recipe

I know most people associate cajun cooking with Louisiana, but plenty of Acadian french, aka “Cajuns”, settled in Mississippi too. So this slow-roasted smoked pot roast recipe does have a slight resemblance to a French-style pot roast.

Simple ingredients working together plus a little spice from the peppers and you have yourself a unique pot roast that has been loved all over the country.

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Traeger Smoked Mississippi Pot Roast

What’s the best cut of beef to use for this recipe?

When you are in the mood for beef, most people think of steak like a ribeye or filet mignon. Me? I dream of pot roast. Roast beef and gravy is one of my favorites, and this one is no exception.

The best cut of beef for pot roasts, in my opinion, happens to be the chuck roast. A chuck roast is the top of the rear legs of the cow. It is a dense cut, and can be fairly lean – so make sure to look for a roast with lots of marbling.

Chuck roast is often cut into cubes and used in slow-cooked stews. It is also ideal for pot roast. It is a tough cut of meat, which is why it is perfect for the low-and-slow cooking that Traegers are so good at. Suddenly, that big tough chunk of meat becomes fork-tender and melt-in-your-mouth amazing.

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Traeger Smoked Mississippi Pot Roast

Do you have to use the peppers?

The pepperoncini is one of the “secret” ingredients that make the Mississippi Pot Roast unique. Pepperoncini are the bright yellow-green peppers you typically see offered in salad bars, and sometimes they are offered as a topping on pizzas.

Traeger Smoked Mississippi Pot Roast

They are not too hot, and much less spicy than their cousin the banana pepper, which look fairly similar. Some people do still find them too hot, so if you are concerned about them adding too much heat, then feel free to cut back on a few. Or, skip this recipe completely and head over to my Traeger Pot Roast recipe which makes a traditional roast and gravy without any peppers or heat.

I would still recommend using just a bit of the juice from the jar, even if you use fewer peppers than the recipe calls for. The vinegar will have a touch of heat, but it will also help break down the meat to be more tender and it is really what gives this dish its signature flavor.

More Traeger Beef Recipes here!

Traeger Smoked Mississippi Pot Roast

How can you tell when a pot roast is done?

Some people worry about overcooking pot roasts. I get the concern, but it isn’t like overcooking a big prime rib. You have way more wiggle room cooking chuck roast, and as long as you keep the heat low it is really hard to overcook them.

With a pot roast, you can easily tell if it is ready with just a fork. If you can stick a fork in easily and twist it and pull out shreds of beef on it, then you know it is ready to eat.

As long as you have plenty of braising liquid in the pot, then the chuck will not dry out.

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Traeger Smoked Mississippi Pot Roast

How long does it take to cook?

With the five-pound chuck I recommend in this recipe, you will be looking at about 3 to 4 hours in the Traeger, but it also depends heavily on the specific cut of meat you purchase too so always cook to temp and not to time.

ThermoWorks Smoke

For all of your wireless grilling needs, the Smoke is the most reliable wireless thermometer I’ve ever used.

If you want to minimize the opening and shutting of your grill, I highly recommend getting a wireless thermometer, like the Thermoworks Smoke. It is my favorite thermometer, and I swear by it for almost every cook. 

Your beef should be shreddable when it gets up to 204°, but I’d start checking it around 195°. 

Thermoworks Smoke

Serve these sides with your Mississippi Pot Roast

Pot roasts always work well with mashed potatoes, especially if you plan on using the jus to make a nice gravy.

If you are going to smoke the roast, then why not also have smoked mashed potatoes too? You can skip the “loaded” part, in this case. Or not. You do you.

Want to keep it Southern? Then try this collard greens recipe too. Also, cornbread should have a place on the plate as well, so check out this cornbread muffin or my griddle corn cakes so you have something to mop up that sauce.

More recipes featuring pot roast

Chuck roast is one of my favorite cuts of meat! Here are a few more fun things you can do with it, that I love:

Check out these great recipes too!

Traeger Smoked Mississippi Pot Roast
Yield: 8 servings

Traeger Smoked Mississippi Pot Roast

Traeger Smoked Mississippi Pot Roast

This tender Mississippi Pot Roast is cooked on your pellet grill, and is all kinds of amazing. If you've never tried a Mississippi Pot Roast, NOW is the time!

Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 5 hours
Total Time 5 hours 15 minutes

Ingredients

  • 5-pound beef chuck roast
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 8 whole pepperoncini peppers
  • 1 packet au jus mix
  • 1 packet dry ranch dressing mix
  • 1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 1/4 cup chopped carrots
  • 1 stick salted butter
  • 1/2 cup water

Instructions

  1. Season the meat with the salt, paprika, onion powder, and black pepper. Preheat a cast-iron skillet or fire up your Blackstone (or another flat top griddle) and give both sides of the meat a good sear.
  2. Preheat your pellet grill to 275°.
  3. Place the seared chuck roast into the bottom of a tinfoil high-sided pan. Pour in the pepperoncini, au jus, ranch mix, garlic, carrots, butter, and water.
  4. Put the whole shebang on the grill, close the lid, and let it ride.
  5. Check the roast every hour or so, and adjust the placement on the grill as needed. You want to avoid hot spots so nothing burns. It shouldn't, but with live fire, you have to pay attention.
  6. Continue cooking until the meat reaches 200-205°, and is fork-tender.
  7. Serve with mashed potatoes, buttered rice, and/or fresh bread.

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Nutrition Information:

Yield:

8

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 812Total Fat: 56gSaturated Fat: 26gTrans Fat: 3gUnsaturated Fat: 26gCholesterol: 267mgSodium: 1767mgCarbohydrates: 8gFiber: 2gSugar: 3gProtein: 72g

Nutrition data provided here is only an estimate.

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Brandon

Thursday 3rd of March 2022

What's the best way to make the gravy for the 🥔

Nicole Johnson

Thursday 3rd of March 2022

If you want to thicken up the cooking liquid some, just drain it off and let the fat separate first. Remove the fat (or use it to make the roux with the butter) and set the broth aside. In a small saucepan, melt some butter and whisk in just under equal amounts of flour. Whisk over low to medium-low heat for a couple of minutes. Bring the stock to a boil in a saucepan and then whisk in the roux and cook until thickened. If you want to extend it to make more gravy, add some additional beef stock.

You can also do a cornstarch slurry with some cold water and cornstarch and whisk it right into the boiling broth, skipping the roux part. It also does the trick to thicken it up a bit and is less hassle. I just prefer the flavor of the roux, personally.

Shaunna Sizemore

Wednesday 4th of August 2021

I normally cook this in the crockpot without any water. I’m going to try it on the smoker this weekend, and I’m wondering if I really need to add the water? Does it need water since it’s on the smoker? I guess I worry about it watering down the flavor. But this is new to me so maybe that isn’t even something I should be worried about.

Shaunna Sizemore

Sunday 8th of August 2021

@Nicole Johnson, thank you so much! On the smoker now :)

Nicole Johnson

Wednesday 4th of August 2021

I've never tried it without the water, but I also wouldn't worry about it watering anything down. With this, you want it to have plenty of liquid, and there's tons of flavor in the end result.

Ashleigh

Sunday 18th of July 2021

What kind of pellets do you use?

Nicole Johnson

Monday 19th of July 2021

Whatever is in my hopper is what I use. ;) We tend to run maple, cherry, or apple, or a blend that is suitable for anything.

Reb

Monday 31st of May 2021

Do you cover the roast with tinfoil while it cooks?

Nicole Johnson

Monday 31st of May 2021

We didn't, but you definitely can if you want to! It'll have less of a smokey flavor that way, but some people prefer that. If you do, I wouldn't cover it until after the first hour or two of cook time.

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