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Instant Pot Wild Rice

Wild Rice is one of my favorite foods, but I don’t use it very often because it takes SO long to cook. Not anymore. Instant Pot Wild Rice cuts the cook time down AND produces the very best wild rice that I’ve ever had.

Instant Pot Wild Rice

Instant Pot Wild Rice

Wild rice can either be really really amazing, or resemble something that on a good day looks (and tastes) like dog food. You know what I’m talking about. It is kind of hard to get it just right sometimes. Or maybe I’m just really particular about the texture of this awesome staple that can be found in any Minnesota kitchen worth its salt.

Either way, you never have to make it another way ever again because I’ve found the VERY best way that there ever was. (Or close to it. You know. Same thing.)

Instant Pot Wild Rice

It doesn’t get easier than this. Pour “rice” into the Instant Pot, pour broth into the Instant Pot. Close lid. Set 15 minutes. Release pressure, open and enjoy.

I need this stuff on hand because it makes such a great addition to soups, bread, stuffing, and salads. Stay tuned later this week on the blog because you’ll be getting my new favorite soup, Minnesota Wild Rice Hotdish Soup. Creamy, dreamy, comfort food, in soup form, and any Minnesota grandma would love a big bowl of this.

I also use this rice in my Corn & Potato Chowder recipe, and it would be perfect in the Beef & Wild Rice Stuffed Zucchini too.

Instant Pot Wild Rice

Instant Pot Wild Rice

Instant Pot Wild Rice

Yield: 6 cups
Prep Time: 2 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 17 minutes

Easy, delicious wild rice cooked in the Instant Pot! Set it and forget it for perfect rice, every time. 

Ingredients

  • 1 cup wild rice, {fancy grade. NOT quick cooking, par cooked, or the cracked stuff.}
  • 4 cups chicken stock or broth

Instructions

  1. Place wild rice and stock into the Instant Pot. Close the lid and set to Manual, high pressure, for 15 minutes. 
  2. NPR (natural pressure release) for 10 minutes, and then vent remaining steam. 
  3. Open and serve! If there is a bit of extra water, drain it. Keep to add to soups, stews, breads, pancakes, or to make into a hotdish or casserole. 

Notes

Don't use "cracked" wild rice in this, or anything that is "quick cooked" or "par cooked". I haven't tested with those kinds of rice. 

Nutrition Information:

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 103 Sodium: 628mg Carbohydrates: 21g Fiber: 1g Sugar: 1g Protein: 3g
Nutrition data provided here is only an estimate. If you are tracking these things for medical purposes please consult an outside, trusted source. Thanks!
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Rosanna

Wednesday 4th of December 2019

This was wayyyyyy too much liquid!! What a waste of chicken broth.

Nicole Johnson

Thursday 5th of December 2019

It really isn't. Wild rice is meant to be cooked in an excess of liquid, unlike other rices. It doesn't turn out the same if you don't use the additional liquid.

Shirley Ellis

Wednesday 4th of December 2019

Wow! At age 63 I finally made the perfect wild rice in my instant pot , thanks to you! This will be a staple in my pantry from now on. Thanks for the recipe and explaining what to expect!

Nicole Johnson

Thursday 5th of December 2019

Thanks, Shirley!

Carrie

Saturday 23rd of November 2019

What would you reccomend for the full bag???

Nicole Johnson

Sunday 24th of November 2019

The full bag of what? It depends on how big the bag is, and how big your Instant Pot is. Wild Rice tends to triple in volume when cooked, so keep that in mind! You can really make as much as you need to with this recipe. Unlike regular rice, there's no magic ratio and you WANT to add more water than you actually need because you'll be draining it off afterward no matter what.

Joan Fallert

Friday 15th of November 2019

Can you use 4 cups of water and 1 cup of wild rice in a 6 qt. Pot? Also, how many does this recipe serve?

Nicole Johnson

Friday 15th of November 2019

This should fit just fine in a 6 quart. How many it feeds depends on what you are putting it into. I don't usually serve wild rice plain, I usually mix it into stuffing, soup, or something like a rice pilaf. 1 cup of uncooked wild rice will yield 3-4 cups of cooked wild rice.

Simone

Tuesday 15th of October 2019

Gah I tried this and it was wayyyyyy too watery. I ended up having to strain all my rice out of the extra liquid

Nicole Johnson

Tuesday 15th of October 2019

Yeah, that's normal, and expected, and definitely covered in the post. Wild rice doesn't cook like regular rice because it isn't rice. Typically you would boil it to cook it. This way is better, but doesn't negate the need to drain the excess water.

Your results will also vary depending on what kind of rice you use. If you use "fast cooking" or wild rice "pilaf" you're going to have a bad time of things (also covered up in the post, it isn't just fluff, I promise.)